(PORTFOLIO) Who Invented And Built It First? Scott Or The Copy Cat Big Tech Bullies…

Who Invented And Built It First? Scott Or The Copy Cat Big Tech Bullies…

There are a handful of guys from Stanford University that all got offices together on Sand Hill Road In Palo Alto, around 2000 Sand Hill Road, or so. They all agreed to only invest in their friend’s things and to only allow certain politicians, that promise them certain kick-backs, to get elected. They signed contracts with every law firm in America that does Big Tech law so that nobody, outside of their group, could hire any tech law firm that they didn’t own and control. That is called “conflicting out a supply chain”. The only lawyers that could possibly help you fight Google, Facebook, Tesla, Twitter, YouTube, and your other competitors already work for Google, Facebook, Tesla, Twitter, YouTube, and your other competitors!

It is even worse when you find out that your Senators, and other public figures, COVERTLY OWN Google, Facebook, Tesla, Twitter, YouTube, and your other competitors, and that those politicians rig the law to help the Big Tech companies they own, while harming you for competing with them!

Investigators have discovered that those competitors hired moles to spy on companies and technologies and they engage in RICO-violating anti-competitive attacks.

Yes, your elected officials turn out to be either: financed by, friends, with, sleeping with, dating the staff of, holding stock market assets in, promised a revolving door job or government service contracts from, partying with, personal friends with, photographed at private events with, exchanging emails with, business associates of or directed by; our business adversaries, or the Senators and politicians that those business adversaries pay campaign finances to, or supply political digital search manipulation services to.

Criminal U.S. Senators and White House staff coordinated and profited in these schemes.

For example; One California Senator’s family owned and controlled A.) Government trained attack ‘spies’ formerly with the CIA, NSA, etc., B.) The leasing contracts for Tesla and Solyndra, C.) Their office staff that threatened Plaintiff in writing and in-person to Plaintiff’s Washington DC staff, D.) the financing for Tesla and Solyndra, E.) The construction services for Tesla and Solyndra, F.) The staffing company for Tesla and Solyndra, G.) The adjacent railroad services for Tesla and Solyndra, H.) Key suppliers for Tesla and Solyndra, I.) Goldman Sachs cooperative relationships for Tesla and Solyndra, J.) Transitions from their own Senate Office staff to revolving door jobs at Tesla and Solyndra, K.) Government decisions for Tesla and Solyndra, L.) The relationship incentives between Google, Tesla and Solyndra and that Senator’s campaign financing to that Senator; and other illicit conflicts of interest. Plaintiff owned the competing electric car company and technology that would have obsoleted Tesla, Google and Solyndra and was the first to begin negotiations with the factory that Tesla later took over at the insistence of that Senator, even though Elon Musk appears in news reports, previously stating that he saw no use for the building for Tesla.

That is why no inventor can hire a big law firm to take on a Google, a Netflix, a Facebook, etc. It is illegal for this Cartel to blockade rights like that, it is an overt violation of RICO laws and anti-trust laws and other laws. The FBI is supposed to ARREST THEM! They never get arrested though, because they own all of the main politicians. Good for them – Bad for America! They are known as the “Silicon Valley Cartel“. They operate EXACTLY like a Mexican Cocaine Cartel but with technology. See more on the Cartel at http://www.usinventor.org

 

A few of Scott’s companies and inventions were a decade earlier than the Google’s, Oculus’s, Facebook’s, Netflix’s of the Silicon Valley Cartel. Scott’s technologies blew the competing technologies away. Scott’s products were faster, lower cost, easier, safer and just kicked the butts of the competitors. The Silicon Valley Cartel is great with Stock Market pump-and-dumps but they suck at inventing anything. They always choose to CHEAT RATHER THAN COMPETE! In a few key circumstances, Scott said “Nope”, you are not going to bully me…and Scott brought the FBI, FTC, DOJ, FTC, SEC and every 1.) law enforcement, 2.) regulatory, 3.) investigative news outlet and 4.) citizen sleuth group right to their front doors…

Scott does not engage in money laundering, bribes of Senators, insider trading, real estate bribe hiding, tax evasion, sex trafficking, valuation collusion, no poaching black-lists, RICO law racketeering violations, anti-trust law violations, mass domestic spying, spousal abuse, etc, like they do.… so it is pretty easy for justice to drop the hammer on EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM

 

Why does it matter?

Because patents on core technologies are worth hundreds of millions, or billions, of dollars. See these third-party analysts value studies of some of Scott’s patents:

 

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A CLAIMS CHART can very quickly resolve the issue of whether, or not, someone else copied an invention that Scott invented, built and offered in the market first. Let’s take a look at some CLAIMS CHARTS for products that Scott invented, built and offered in the market first and then Big Tech big bullies copied. A CLAIMS CHART usually looks like this:

The following chart compares certain claims of U.S. Patent , Xxxxxx,Inc.’s Xxxxxx protocol.

ROUGH DRAFT 1.1 CONFIDENTIAL- WORKING DOCUMENT- Right side protocol notesare still being researched.

PUBLISHED CLAIMS:

Claims

The invention claimed is:

1. A system for providing load balanced, secure media content deliveryin a distributed computing environment, the system comprising: a centralized control center that segments and encrypts media contentinto a set of individual encrypted segments, a plurality of the segments being a portion of or an entirety of a media content size,the centralized control center including an encryption module stored in memory and executable by a processor to encrypt each individualsegment to a unique encryption key; a plurality of intermediate control nodes that stage the set of individual encrypted segments; aplurality of intermediate servers that mirror individual encrypted segments from the staged set; at least one client that: sendsrequests for the media content to the centralized control center, receives the set of individual encrypted segments from one of anintermediate control node and an intermediate server optimally sited from a requesting client, and reassembles the set of individualencrypted segments into the media content for media playback, and includes: a broadcasting module stored in memory and executable tobroadcast a pulse prior to receiving individually encrypted segments, and a request processing module stored in memory and executable toselect the optimally sited one of intermediate control node and intermediate server based on responses to the pulse for subsequentreceipt of the set of individual encrypted segments; and a mirroring module stored in memory and executable to mirror individual encryptedsegments from a staged complete set to a plurality of peer clients, wherein the request processing module receives the set of individualencrypted segments from one of the intermediate control node, the intermediate server and the plurality of peer clients optimally sitedfrom the requesting client.

2. The system of claim 1, further comprising: a request queue stored inmemory and executable to queue requests from a plurality of clients on at least one of a single intermediate control node andintermediate server; and a multicasting module stored in memory and executable on at least one of the single intermediate control nodeand intermediate server and that multicasts the set of individual encrypted segments to the plurality of clients.

3. The system of claim 1, further comprising a segmentation modulestored in memory and executable to determine the media content size for each individual encrypted segment based on a running time of themedia content.

4. The system of claim 1, further comprising a codec module stored inmemory at each requesting client and executable to decode each individual encrypted segment.

5. The system of claim 1, wherein the centralized control centerbalances media content delivery between each intermediate control node and intermediate server.

6. The system of claim 1, further comprising a playback module stored inmemory and executable to allow for media playback at each requesting client prior to receipt of the individually encrypted segments.

7. The system of claim 1, further comprising a playback module stored inmemory and executable to provide flexible media playback at each requesting client, the flexible media playback including functionsselected from group consisting of pause, rewind, fast-forward, skip forward, skip backward, chapter stops, and shuttle.

8. The system of claim 1, wherein each segment has a same fixed size.

9. The system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of intermediate serversmirror individual encrypted segments from the staged set, the staged set being a staged complete set.

10. The system of claim 1, wherein the at least one client receives eachindividual encrypted segment from one of the intermediate control node and the intermediate server optimally sited from the requestingclient.

11. The system of claim 1, wherein the broadcasting module broadcasts thepulse prior to receiving each individually encrypted segment.

12. The system of claim 1, wherein the request processing module selectsthe optimally sited one of the intermediate control node and the intermediate server based on responses to the pulse for subsequentreceipt of each individual encrypted segment.

Patent: Claim 1

Xxxxxx Protocol

1. A system for providing load balanced, secure media content delivery in a distributed computing environment, the system comprising: a centralized control center

that segments and encrypts media content into a set of individual encrypted segments,

a plurality of the segments being a portion of or an entirety of a media content size, the centralized control center including an encryption module stored in memory and executable by a processor to encrypt each individual segment to a unique encryption key; a plurality of intermediate control nodes that stage the set of individual encrypted segments; a plurality of intermediate servers that mirror individual encrypted segments from the staged set; at least one client that: sends requests for the media content to the centralized control center, receives the set of individual encrypted segments from one of an intermediate control node and an intermediate server optimally sited from a requesting client, and reassembles the set of individual encrypted segments into the media content for media playback, and includes: a broadcasting module stored in memory and executable to broadcast a pulse prior to receiving individually encrypted segments, and a request processing module stored in memory and executable to select the optimally sited one of intermediate control node and intermediate server based on responses to the pulse for subsequent receipt of the set of individual encrypted segments; and a mirroring module stored in memory and executable to mirror individual encrypted segments from a staged complete set to a plurality of peer clients, wherein the request processing module receives the set of individual encrypted segments from one of the intermediate control node, the intermediate server and the plurality of peer clients optimally sited from the requesting client.

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Other sites, like legaltorrents.com, offer torrents of all kinds of things – these sites are just repositories of torrents and usually don’t actually create any of the content available. They’re known as indexes or trackers – there is a subtle difference between the two. (The Wikipedia article on Xxxxxx trackers explains the difference.)”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“Torrent files are typically published on websites or elsewhere, and registered with a tracker. The tracker maintains lists of the clients currently participating in the torrent.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“[T]he official Xxxxxx client program uses a mechanism called “optimistic unchoking”, where the client reserves a portion of its available bandwidth for sending pieces to random peers (not necessarily known-good partners, so called preferred peers), in hopes of discovering even better partners and to ensure that newcomers get a chance to join the swarm.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“A tracker should be differentiated from a Xxxxxx index by the fact that it does not necessarily list files that are being tracked. A Xxxxxx index is a list of .torrent files, usually including descriptions and other information. Trackers merely coordinate communication between peers attempting to download the payload of the torrents.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Many Xxxxxx websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: A Xxxxxx tracker is coupled to the central servers and end-user computers in the peer-to-peer network for the delivery of the requested media files, which includes accounting for network throughput conditions.

“Throughout the download process, Xxxxxx DNA carefully balances its use of peer and CDN or server resources, downloading from all, in parallel, to meet per-object or streaming media QoS requirements.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA scales organically with demand, providing capacity exactly where and when you need it. . . . Xxxxxx DNA automatically scales its delivery capacity with demand to ensure a consistently high-quality user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Seeding is where you leave your Xxxxxx client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Xxxxxx (often abbreviated as BT) is a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol (a description and set of rules on how to do things) created by Bram Cohen, designed to distribute data in such a way that the original distributor would be able to decrease bandwidth usage while still being able to reach at least the same amount of people. Cohen’s idea was to “break” the file being transferred into smaller segments called pieces. To save bandwidth, each person downloading (more commonly referred to as peers in the Xxxxxx community) would have the pieces that they acquired available for upload to other peers in the swarm (the entire network of people connected to a single torrent). In this way, much of the load of sharing the file to every peer interested in it is offloaded to the peers. Note that a seed is basically a peer with every piece, so when a peer successfully attains all data in the torrent contents, that peer becomes a seed as well.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/xxxxxx-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-xxxxxx

“In order for everyone to be able to locate one another, there needs to be some centralized location that peers could connect to in order to obtain the other peers’ IP addresses. Xxxxxx trackers serve as this centralized location. In the most basic explanation, for each given swarm, a tracker only needs to collect a peer’s IP address and port number to share with other peers connecting to that same swarm.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/xxxxxx-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-xxxxxx

“The initial distributor of the complete file or collection acts as the first seed. Each peer who downloads the data also uploads it to other peers, even after they have dismounted the original seed.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“Each client is capable of preparing, requesting, and transmitting any type of computer file over a network, using the protocol.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

Downloading torrents and sharing files

Users browse the web to find a torrent of interest, download it, and open it with a Xxxxxx client. The client connects to the tracker(s) specified in the torrent file, from which it receives a list of peers currently transferring pieces of the file(s) specified in the torrent. The client connects to those peers to obtain the various pieces. Such a group of peers connected to each other to share a torrent is called a swarm. If the swarm contains only the initial seeder, the client connects directly to it and begins to request pieces. As peers enter the swarm, they begin to trade pieces with one another, instead of downloading directly from the seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Many Xxxxxx websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 2

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, further comprising: a request queue stored in memory and executable to queue requests from a plurality of clients on at least one of a single intermediate control node and intermediate server; and a multicasting module stored in memory and executable on at least one of the single intermediate control node and intermediate server and that multicasts the set of individual encrypted segments to the plurality of clients. See Claim 1.

General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Xxxxxx Protocol uses “torrent” files, which includes metadata about the files. These “torrent” files are treated as a number of identically sized pieces during distribution, wherein the metadata contained therein provides the necessary information to allow distribution to occur.

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“Many Xxxxxx websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 3

Kontiki’s Delivery Management System

The system of claim 1, further comprising a segmentation module stored in memory and executable to determine the media content size for each individual encrypted segment based on a running time of the media content.

See Claim 1.

General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases for the storage of media files.1

“Xxxxxx DNA uses one or more existing origin servers or CDNs to seed a managed peer network.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Throughout the download process, Xxxxxx DNA carefully balances its use of peer and CDN or server resources, downloading from all, in parallel, to meet per-object or streaming media QoS requirements.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA scales organically with demand, providing capacity exactly where and when you need it. . . . Xxxxxx DNA automatically scales its delivery capacity with demand to ensure a consistently high-quality user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Seeding is where you leave your Xxxxxx client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Xxxxxx (often abbreviated as BT) is a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol (a description and set of rules on how to do things) created by Bram Cohen, designed to distribute data in such a way that the original distributor would be able to decrease bandwidth usage while still being able to reach at least the same amount of people. Cohen’s idea was to “break” the file being transferred into smaller segments called pieces. To save bandwidth, each person downloading (more commonly referred to as peers in the Xxxxxx community) would have the pieces that they acquired available for upload to other peers in the swarm (the entire network of people connected to a single torrent). In this way, much of the load of sharing the file to every peer interested in it is offloaded to the peers. Note that a seed is basically a peer with every piece, so when a peer successfully attains all data in the torrent contents, that peer becomes a seed as well.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/xxxxxx-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-xxxxxx

“The initial distributor of the complete file or collection acts as the first seed. Each peer who downloads the data also uploads it to other peers, even after they have dismounted the original seed.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

Downloading torrents and sharing files

Users browse the web to find a torrent of interest, download it, and open it with a Xxxxxx client. The client connects to the tracker(s) specified in the torrent file, from which it receives a list of peers currently transferring pieces of the file(s) specified in the torrent. The client connects to those peers to obtain the various pieces. Such a group of peers connected to each other to share a torrent is called a swarm. If the swarm contains only the initial seeder, the client connects directly to it and begins to request pieces. As peers enter the swarm, they begin to trade pieces with one another, instead of downloading directly from the seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_(protocol)

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 4

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, further comprising a codec module stored in memory at each requesting client and executable to decode each individual encrypted segment. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file.

“Seeding is where you leave your Xxxxxx client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 5

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein the centralized control center balances media content delivery between each intermediate control node and intermediate server. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system.

“Seeding is where you leave your Xxxxxx client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 6

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, further comprising a playback module stored in memory and executable to allow for media playback at each requesting client prior to receipt of the individually encrypted segments. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 7

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, further comprising a playback module stored in memory and executable to provide flexible media playback at each requesting client, the flexible media playback including functions selected from group consisting of pause, rewind, fast-forward, skip forward, skip backward, chapter stops, and shuttle. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 8

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein each segment has a same fixed size General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 9

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of intermediate servers mirror individual encrypted segments from the staged set, the staged set being a staged complete set. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 10

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein the at least one client receives each individual encrypted segment from one of the intermediate control node and the intermediate server optimally sited from the requesting client. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 11

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein the broadcasting module broadcasts the pulse prior to receiving each individually encrypted segment. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

Patent: Claim 12

Xxxxxx Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein the request processing module selects the optimally sited one of the intermediate control node and the intermediate server based on responses to the pulse for subsequent receipt of each individual encrypted segment. General Summary of the Xxxxxx Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The Xxxxxx protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the Xxxxxx tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The Xxxxxx Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“Xxxxxx DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: Xxxxxx’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of Xxxxxx caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, Xxxxxx DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.xxxxxx.com/dna/technology/

“A Xxxxxx tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the Xxxxxx protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xxxxxx_tracker

SO THAT IS THE GENERIC VERSION. LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT SOME SPECIFIC CHARTS AGAINST SCOTT’S BIGGEST COPYCATS:

Let’s take a look at one of Scott’s issued patent’s against Bittorrent, who many people say copied their whole tech and business model from Scott:

The following chart compares certain claims of one of Scott’s U.S. Patent’s to BitTorrent, Inc.’s BitTorrent protocol.

Scott Patent: Claim 1

BitTorrent Protocol

A media distribution system, comprising:

“BitTorrent is the global standard for delivering high-quality files over the Internet. With an installed base of over 160 million clients worldwide, BitTorrent technology has turned conventional distribution economics on its head. The more popular a large video, audio or software file, the faster and cheaper it can be transferred with BitTorrent.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/what-is-bittorrent/

“BitTorrent 6 is a client. A ‘client’ in this case is a computer program that follows the rules of a protocol. . . . The BitTorrent 6 client will give you access to the world of content on the protocol in a lightweight, fast and reliable package.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/what-is-bittorrent/

“BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer file sharing protocol used to distribute large amounts of data. BitTorrent is one of the most common protocols for transferring large files, and by some estimates it accounts for about 35% of all traffic on the entire Internet.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

a media file database configured to store media files, wherein one or more of the media files have been compressed prior to storage in the media file database;

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases.1

“Throughout the download process, BitTorrent DNA carefully balances its use of peer and CDN or server resources, downloading from all, in parallel, to meet per-object or streaming media QoS requirements.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA is designed to complement existing delivery mechanisms, including content delivery networks (CDNs) and traditional web servers. To provide maximum flexibility and robustness, BitTorrent DNA can seed its managed peer network from multiple CDNs in parallel.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent is a protocol (a set of rules and description of how to do things) allowing you to download files quickly by allowing people downloading the file to upload (distribute) parts of it at the same time.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/what-is-bittorrent/

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Seeding is where you leave your BitTorrent client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“BitTorrent (often abbreviated as BT) is a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol (a description and set of rules on how to do things) created by Bram Cohen, designed to distribute data in such a way that the original distributor would be able to decrease bandwidth usage while still being able to reach at least the same amount of people. . . . In this way, much of the load of sharing the file to every peer interested in it is offloaded to the peers. Note that a seed is basically a peer with every piece, so when a peer successfully attains all data in the torrent contents, that peer becomes a seed as well.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/bittorrent-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-bittorrent

“The initial distributor of the complete file or collection acts as the first seed. Each peer who downloads the data also uploads it to other peers, even after they have dismounted the original seed.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Each client is capable of preparing, requesting, and transmitting any type of computer file over a network, using the protocol.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“A peer is any computer running an instance of a client.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Web seeding was implemented in 2006 as the ability of BitTorrent clients to download torrent pieces from an HTTP source in addition to the swarm. The advantage of this feature is that a site may distribute a torrent for a particular file or batch of files and make those files available for download from that same web server; this can simplify seeding and load balancing greatly once support for this feature is implemented in the various BitTorrent clients.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Some clients, like Torrentflux, can be run straight from a server, allowing hosting companies to offer speeds unavailable to most users. Sites such as Torrent2FTP offer services to download torrents and then make them available to the customer on a FTP server.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

a computing device configured to receive user requests for delivery of the one or more of the media files stored in the media file database,

the computing device further configured to: identify average network throughput between computing device and the requesting users;

and route the user requests for delivery of the requested one or more media files to a distribution server capable of servicing the user requests based upon at least the average network throughput;

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: A BitTorrent tracker is a server that acts as a centralized locations configured to receive user requests for the delivery of media files in the media file databases. Delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“A BitTorrent tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the BitTorrent protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“In order for everyone to be able to locate one another, there needs to be some centralized location that peers could connect to in order to obtain the other peers’ IP addresses. BitTorrent trackers serve as this centralized location. In the most basic explanation, for each given swarm, a tracker only needs to collect a peer’s IP address and port number to share with other peers connecting to that same swarm.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/bittorrent-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-bittorrent

“Use of the peer network is tightly controlled by a specialized tracker operated by BitTorrent, Inc. and accessible to BitTorrent DNA customers through a web-based dashboard that provides control and reporting tools.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

Downloading torrents and sharing files

Users browse the web to find a torrent of interest, download it, and open it with a BitTorrent client. The client connects to the tracker(s) specified in the torrent file, from which it receives a list of peers currently transferring pieces of the file(s) specified in the torrent. The client connects to those peers to obtain the various pieces. Such a group of peers connected to each other to share a torrent is called a swarm. If the swarm contains only the initial seeder, the client connects directly to it and begins to request pieces. As peers enter the swarm, they begin to trade pieces with one another, instead of downloading directly from the seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“BitTorrent DNA scales organically with demand, providing capacity exactly where and when you need it. . . . BitTorrent DNA automatically scales its delivery capacity with demand to ensure a consistently high-quality user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: BitTorrent’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of BitTorrent caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, BitTorrent DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA uses one or more existing origin servers or CDNs to seed a managed peer network.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

How do I download files using BitTorrent?

Just like you need a URL like ‘www.google.com’ to go to a web site and download content, you need a ‘torrent file’, a small file that tells the BitTorrent client the necessary info to download the content you want. This is generally obtained from a torrent website.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Other sites, like legaltorrents.com, offer torrents of all kinds of things – these sites are just repositories of torrents and usually don’t actually create any of the content available. They’re known as indexes or trackers – there is a subtle difference between the two. (The Wikipedia article on BitTorrent trackers explains the difference.)”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Torrent files are typically published on websites or elsewhere, and registered with a tracker. The tracker maintains lists of the clients currently participating in the torrent.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“[T]he official BitTorrent client program uses a mechanism called “optimistic unchoking”, where the client reserves a portion of its available bandwidth for sending pieces to random peers (not necessarily known-good partners, so called preferred peers), in hopes of discovering even better partners and to ensure that newcomers get a chance to join the swarm.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“A tracker should be differentiated from a BitTorrent index by the fact that it does not necessarily list files that are being tracked. A BitTorrent index is a list of .torrent files, usually including descriptions and other information. Trackers merely coordinate communication between peers attempting to download the payload of the torrents.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Many BitTorrent websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

and a distribution server coupled to the media file database, the distribution server configured to simultaneously deliver a single copy of the requested one or more of the media files identified in the routed user requests to the requesting users in less-than-real-time, wherein the distribution server automatically adjusts delivery of the requested one or more media files to the requesting users based on current average network throughput between the distribution server and the requesting users.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: A BitTorrent tracker is coupled to the central servers and end-user computers in the peer-to-peer network for the delivery of the requested media files, which includes accounting for network throughput conditions.

“Throughout the download process, BitTorrent DNA carefully balances its use of peer and CDN or server resources, downloading from all, in parallel, to meet per-object or streaming media QoS requirements.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA scales organically with demand, providing capacity exactly where and when you need it. . . . BitTorrent DNA automatically scales its delivery capacity with demand to ensure a consistently high-quality user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: BitTorrent’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of BitTorrent caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, BitTorrent DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Seeding is where you leave your BitTorrent client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“BitTorrent (often abbreviated as BT) is a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol (a description and set of rules on how to do things) created by Bram Cohen, designed to distribute data in such a way that the original distributor would be able to decrease bandwidth usage while still being able to reach at least the same amount of people. Cohen’s idea was to “break” the file being transferred into smaller segments called pieces. To save bandwidth, each person downloading (more commonly referred to as peers in the BitTorrent community) would have the pieces that they acquired available for upload to other peers in the swarm (the entire network of people connected to a single torrent). In this way, much of the load of sharing the file to every peer interested in it is offloaded to the peers. Note that a seed is basically a peer with every piece, so when a peer successfully attains all data in the torrent contents, that peer becomes a seed as well.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/bittorrent-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-bittorrent

“In order for everyone to be able to locate one another, there needs to be some centralized location that peers could connect to in order to obtain the other peers’ IP addresses. BitTorrent trackers serve as this centralized location. In the most basic explanation, for each given swarm, a tracker only needs to collect a peer’s IP address and port number to share with other peers connecting to that same swarm.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/bittorrent-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-bittorrent

“The initial distributor of the complete file or collection acts as the first seed. Each peer who downloads the data also uploads it to other peers, even after they have dismounted the original seed.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Each client is capable of preparing, requesting, and transmitting any type of computer file over a network, using the protocol.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

Downloading torrents and sharing files

Users browse the web to find a torrent of interest, download it, and open it with a BitTorrent client. The client connects to the tracker(s) specified in the torrent file, from which it receives a list of peers currently transferring pieces of the file(s) specified in the torrent. The client connects to those peers to obtain the various pieces. Such a group of peers connected to each other to share a torrent is called a swarm. If the swarm contains only the initial seeder, the client connects directly to it and begins to request pieces. As peers enter the swarm, they begin to trade pieces with one another, instead of downloading directly from the seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“A BitTorrent tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the BitTorrent protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Many BitTorrent websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

Scott’s Patent: Claim 2

BitTorrent Protocol

The system of claim 1, wherein one or more of the media files is divided into a plurality of frames, at least one of the plurality of frames including a header.

See Claim 1.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: BitTorrent Protocol uses “torrent” files, which includes metadata about the files. These “torrent” files are treated as a number of identically sized pieces during distribution, wherein the metadata contained therein provides the necessary information to allow distribution to occur.

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“Many BitTorrent websites act as both tracker and index. Sites such as these publicize the tracker’s URL and allow users to upload torrents to the index with the tracker’s URL embedded in them, providing all the features necessary to initiate a download.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

Scott’s Patent: Claim 14

Kontiki’s Delivery Management System

The system of claim 1, further comprising a second distribution server coupled to a second media file database, the second media file database configured to store media files, wherein one or more of the media files have been compressed prior to storage in the second media file database.

See Claim 1.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases for the storage of media files.2

“BitTorrent DNA uses one or more existing origin servers or CDNs to seed a managed peer network.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Throughout the download process, BitTorrent DNA carefully balances its use of peer and CDN or server resources, downloading from all, in parallel, to meet per-object or streaming media QoS requirements.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA scales organically with demand, providing capacity exactly where and when you need it. . . . BitTorrent DNA automatically scales its delivery capacity with demand to ensure a consistently high-quality user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: BitTorrent’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of BitTorrent caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, BitTorrent DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“Seeding is where you leave your BitTorrent client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“BitTorrent (often abbreviated as BT) is a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol (a description and set of rules on how to do things) created by Bram Cohen, designed to distribute data in such a way that the original distributor would be able to decrease bandwidth usage while still being able to reach at least the same amount of people. Cohen’s idea was to “break” the file being transferred into smaller segments called pieces. To save bandwidth, each person downloading (more commonly referred to as peers in the BitTorrent community) would have the pieces that they acquired available for upload to other peers in the swarm (the entire network of people connected to a single torrent). In this way, much of the load of sharing the file to every peer interested in it is offloaded to the peers. Note that a seed is basically a peer with every piece, so when a peer successfully attains all data in the torrent contents, that peer becomes a seed as well.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/bittorrent-user-manual/chapter-02-basic-guides/basics-bittorrent

“The initial distributor of the complete file or collection acts as the first seed. Each peer who downloads the data also uploads it to other peers, even after they have dismounted the original seed.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“To share a file or group of files, a peer first creates a small file called a “torrent” (e.g. MyFile.torrent). This file contains metadata about the files to be shared and about the tracker, the computer that coordinates the file distribution. Peers that want to download the file must first obtain a torrent file for it, and connect to the specified tracker, which tells them from which other peers to download the pieces of the file.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“The peer distributing a data file treats the file as a number of identically-sized pieces, typically between 64 kB and 4 MB each. The peer creates a checksum for each piece, using the SHA1 hashing algorithm, and records it in the torrent file. Pieces with sizes greater than 512 kB will reduce the size of a torrent file for a very large payload, but is claimed to reduce the efficiency of the protocol. When another peer later receives a particular piece, the checksum of the piece is compared to the recorded checksum to test that the piece is error-free. Peers that provide a complete file are called seeders, and the peer providing the initial copy is called the initial seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

Downloading torrents and sharing files

Users browse the web to find a torrent of interest, download it, and open it with a BitTorrent client. The client connects to the tracker(s) specified in the torrent file, from which it receives a list of peers currently transferring pieces of the file(s) specified in the torrent. The client connects to those peers to obtain the various pieces. Such a group of peers connected to each other to share a torrent is called a swarm. If the swarm contains only the initial seeder, the client connects directly to it and begins to request pieces. As peers enter the swarm, they begin to trade pieces with one another, instead of downloading directly from the seeder.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_(protocol)

“A BitTorrent tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the BitTorrent protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

944 Patent: Claim 15

BitTorrent Protocol

The system of claim 14, wherein the computing device is further configured to determine if the distribution server is no longer able to simultaneously deliver the requested one or more of the media files identified in the routed user requests to the requesting users in less-than-real-time after commencing delivery of the requested one or more media files.

See Claims 1 and 14.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The BitTorrent protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file.

“Seeding is where you leave your BitTorrent client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

Scott’s Patent: Claim 16

BitTorrent Protocol

The system of claim 15, wherein the computing device is further configured to reroute responsibility for the continued delivery of the requested one or more media files to the second distribution server.

See Claims 1, 14 and 15.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The BitTorrent protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer able to distribute the requested file, the BitTorrent tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system.

“Seeding is where you leave your BitTorrent client open after you’ve finished your download to help distribute it (you distribute the file while downloading, but it’s even more helpful if you continue to distribute the full file even after you have finished downloading).”

http://www.bittorrent.com/btusers/guides/beginners-guide

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

944 Patent: Claim 17

BitTorrent Protocol

The system of claim 14, wherein the computing device is further configured to determine if the distribution server is no longer able to optimally and simultaneously deliver the requested one or more of the media files identified in the routed user requests to the requesting users after commencing delivery of the requested one or more media files.

See Claims 1 and 14.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The BitTorrent protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the BitTorrent tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The BitTorrent Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: BitTorrent’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of BitTorrent caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, BitTorrent DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“A BitTorrent tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the BitTorrent protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

Scott’s Patent: Claim 18

BitTorrent Protocol

The system of claim 14, wherein the computing device is further configured to determine if the distribution server is no longer able to optimally and simultaneously deliver the requested one or more of the media files identified in the routed user requests to the requesting users after commencing delivery of the requested one or more media files.

See Claims 1 and 14.

General Summary of the BitTorrent Protocol’s Satisfaction of Claim Element: Content delivery network servers (such as media servers) and end-user computers (“peers”) in the peer-to-peer network are configured to act as one or more media file databases. The BitTorrent protocol is dependent on multiple peers participating in the distribution of a file, including when one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file. When one peer or distribution server is no longer the optimal method for distribution of the requested file, the BitTorrent tracker identifies and utilizes other peers or distribution servers in the system. The BitTorrent Protocol’s delivery of content is scaled to leverage network capacity.

“Our proprietary transport technology leverages the full available network capacity of all paths without disrupting other applications.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA automatically moderates its use of the network to ensure that web browsing, voice over IP (VoIP), Internet gaming, and other applications are not disrupted.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“BitTorrent DNA contains a number of enhancements to mitigate the impact of peer networking on service provider networks. These enhancements include: BitTorrent’s sophisticated congestion-avoiding transport technology; an intelligent peer selection algorithm that prefers peers on the same LAN, network, or AS; and work with vendors of BitTorrent caching products to support local cache discovery. By keeping traffic local and non-congestive, BitTorrent DNA reduces long-haul and peering traffic for service providers, while improving the end-user experience.”

http://www.bittorrent.com/dna/technology/

“A BitTorrent tracker is a server which assists in the communication between peers using the BitTorrent protocol. It is also, in the absence of extensions to the original protocol, the only major critical point, as clients are required to communicate with the tracker to initiate downloads. Clients that have already begun downloading also communicate with the tracker periodically to negotiate with newer peers and provide statistics; however, after the initial reception of peer data, peer communication can continue without a tracker.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker

“Multi-tracker torrents feature multiple trackers in the one torrent. This way, should one tracker fail, the others can continue supporting file transfer.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_tracker